Articles & SRLN Newsletters

Article: Liberty, Justice, and Legal Automata (Lauritsen (2013)

This article, by Mark Lauritsen @marclauritsen, expands on the analysis begun by the author in a computer science journal piece called Are We Free To Code The Law?

Resource: SRLN Access to Civil Justice Twitter Trends

2017:

Resource: SRLN Newsletters

2016 SRLN Newsletter, Volume 2, Issue 2 (April 2016)

Paper: Non-Lawyer Legal Assistance Roles (Clarke 2015)

The Utah Supreme Court has created a committee to study the possibility of creating a limited license legal technician - or something along those lines - in Utah.

Article: The Disconnect Between the Requirements of Judicial Neutrality and Those of the Appearance of Neutrality when Parties Appear Pro Se: Causes, Solutions, Recommendations, and Implications (Zorza 2004)

In this article Richard Zorza explores the concept of engaged neutrality by the judge creates a more transparent and arguably more ethically neutral playing field for the self-represented litigant.

Article: California’s Family Law Facilitator Program: A New Paradigm for the Courts (Harrison, Chase, Surh 2000)

 In 1997, California introduced its Family Law Facilitator Program to guide unrepresented family litigants through the judicial process.

Article: Community Courts and Family (Chase, Alexander, Miller 2000)

The authors introduce the idea of a community court as an interaction among courts, social service agencies, and the community.

Article: Self-Represented Litigants in Family Law: The Response of California’s Courts (Hough 2010)

This article summarizes California's response to self-represented litigants.

Article: Unbundling and the Lawyer's Duty of Care (Hornsby 2012)

This article looks at the standards set in the ABA's Model Rules of Professional Conduct 1.2(c) and how to implement it with actual cllients in consultations, document assembly, and advocacy.

Article: No Legal Advice from Court Personnel - What Does that Mean (Greacen 1995)

This is the seminal article that explores the underlying rationale that resulted in the blanket prohibtion of clerk's not being able to provide information to the public for fear that it would be advice.