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Results 1 - 6 of 6 for Reports, Evaluations, Best Practices, Surveys, Strategic Planning, 2015

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Survey/Report: Self-Represented Litigation in Nebraska: Survey of Judges and Clerks (Nebraska 2015)

This is a joint project of the Nebraska Supreme Court Committee on Self-Represented Litigants and Nebraska Legal Aid that surveys judges and clerks about self-representation. Strategic Planning Reports Surveys Nebraska United States Self Represented Litig ...

Report: Civil Non-Family Cases Filed in the Supreme Court of BC Research, Results and Lessons Learned (Canadian Forum on Civil Justice 2015)

The is the Final Report of the Canadian Forum on Civil Justice 's(CFCJ's) Attrition Study entitled Civil Non-Family Cases Filed in the Supreme Court of BC Research, Results and Lessons Learned. This study, which is a part of the CFCJ's larg ...

SRLN Brief: Communications Resources (SRLN 2015)

A communications strategy, which is central to any project's success, not only charts communications with internal and external customers, but also serves as an important driver for the metrics collected to measure success. Voices for Civil Justice h ...

Report: Supreme Court Task Force to Examine Limited Legal Licensing (Utah 2015)

From the Introduction: Probably most Utah communities are not that different from “Middle City, USA,” a mid-size, mid-West community that was the location of the 2014 Community Needs and Services Study by the American Bar Association.1 In a random samplin ...

Weblink: The Court Statistics Project (NCSC 2015)

Weblink: The Court Statistics Project (NCSC 2015)

The Court Statistics Project (CSP) — a joint project of the National Center for State Courts (NCSC) and the Conference of State Court Administrators (COSCA) — publishes caseload data from the courts of the fifty states, the District of Columbia, and Puert ...

SRLN Brief: Procedural Fairness / Procedural Justice (SRLN 2015)

SRLN Brief: Procedural Fairness / Procedural Justice (SRLN 2015)

Research has shown that when defendants and litigants perceive the court process to be fair, they are more likely to comply with court orders and follow the law in the future—regardless of whether they “win” or “lose” their case. This is called procedural ...